Where the US Open will be won & lost

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Chambers Bay is an unknown quantity for almost every player in the field, most of whom will not have previously played a course that only opened in 2007. To quote the USGA’s Mike Davis, “This golf course is a unique challenge – there’s something interesting happening on every single hole.” Of the 18 though, these three stand out as being the big game-changers.

Hole 10
High Dunes, par 4, 436/473yds
Pretty but punishing. A shorter, safer tee shot here can be played to a very wide fairway, but then requires
a longer uphill second to a long and narrow green that’s set diagonally. A driver eases pressure on the second shot but the landing area narrows considerably as it moves toward the hole. Miss the fairway in that zone, and accept it’s a bogey.

The entrance to the green at the 10th hole at Chambers Bay is extremely well-guarded.

The entrance to the green at the 10th hole at Chambers Bay is extremely well-guarded.

Hole 15
Lone Fir, par 3, 123/167/246yds
Lone Fir offers such a wide range of yardages off the tee, this solid par 3 could be the beginning of some exciting finishes – or the start of some nervous lurches towards the house. It has the potential to be different every day: perhaps a tough par, perhaps the kind of birdie opportunity a player can’t afford to miss if he’s going to stay in the hunt.

There is no lack of sand at Chambers Bay’s treacherous 15th hole.

There is no lack of sand at Chambers Bay’s treacherous 15th hole.

Hole 18
Tahoma, par 4/5, 525/604yds
The big-drama hole, with the par changing day to day, this is likely to be the most pivotal hole. The challenge changes dramatically with the par, but what remains is a fairway dotted with bunkers and swales. The green that awaits undulates more than any other on the course, which should guarantee the biggest drama is saved for the very end.

Chambers Bay’s controversial closing hole will play as a par 4 and a par 5 during the US Open.

Chambers Bay’s controversial closing hole will play as a par 4 and a par 5 during the US Open.

Nick Wright