Best Golf Courses in Birmingham

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Quality not quantity abounds in and around England’s second city, with four magnificent Top 100 clubs close to its heart.

The Belfry Golf Club

The Belfry is ranked number 59 in the Golf World Top 100 Courses England

The lowest of the four clubs ranked inside our Top 100 of England is Birmingham’s most celebrated. Host of more Ryder Cups than any other venue in the world (four), home to three courses and the 10th-best resort in GB and Ireland, there’s more than enough reason to spend all weekend here and never leave the grounds. If time is tight and you only play one, take on the Brabazon, a stern, history-rich test.

Little Aston Golf Club

Little Aston Golf Club is ranked number 34 in the Golf World Top 100 Courses England

In our most recent list of the Top 100 courses in England, Little Aston was the highest ranked of the four courses covered here. More impressively, it was the highest ranked parkland course in the list for the second consecutive year. A sophisticated and subtle design, Harry Vardon crafted the original layout, while Harry Colt later added his trademark bunkering. Between them, they created a composite of real class.

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Blackwell Golf Club

Blackwell Golf Club is ranked number 57 in the Golf World Top 100 Courses England

The fact that Blackwell is a regular Open Championship Qualifying course speaks volumes of the challenge awaiting you here, as does the fact Bobby Jones played it the day after winning the Open at Hoylake in 1930. Despite both accolades it remains underrated, despite being touched by the genius of Herbert Fowler and Tom Simpson. The 181-yard 13th supposedly inspired Augusta’s 12th hole, while bunkers are a constant feature. Compact and cramped in places, it remains a hugely enjoyable experience.

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Beau Desert Golf Club

Blackwell Golf Club is ranked number 40 in the Golf World Top 100 Courses England

Translating as ‘Beautiful Wilderness’, Herbert Fowler’s intricate and entertaining layout flows over an undulating tract of the heather-laden Cannock Chase, boasting narrow, rolling spruce-, fir- and pinelined fairways and sprawling greens complexes with wicked undulations. It’s not long by modern standards, but the devil is in the detail and its subtle defences.

Sarah Pyett